Events Gurmeet Batra  

1839: Louis Daguerre displays the first photo of the moon

1839: Louis Daguerre displays the first photo of the moon. Astronomers immediately encompassed the use of photographic plates because of their good presentation and the ability to make much larger imagesDaguerre himself is believed to be the first person to take a photograph of the moon, using his daguerreotype process, on January 2, 1839.

1839: Louis Daguerre displays the first photo of the moon
1839: Louis Daguerre displays the first photo of the moon

Daguerreotype by John W. Draper from 1840 is the first photo of the moon. Taken from his rooftop watchtower at New York University, the image has since provided huge damage.

Daguerre himself is believed to be the first person to take a photograph of the moon, using his daguerreotype process, on January 2, 1839. Regrettably, in March of that same year, his whole laboratory burnt to the ground, crushing all his written records and much of his early experimental work–and that historical image of the moon. A year later, John William Draper, an American doctor, and chemist took his daguerreotype of the moon.

The founding fathers of photography Louis Daguerre
The founding fathers of photography Louis Daguerre

Louis Daguerre was born on 18 November 1787 and he died on 10 July 1851. He was a French artist and photographer, remembered for his invention of the daguerreotype process of photography. He became known as one of the founding fathers of photography. Though he is most recognized for his contributions to photography, he was also an expert painter and a developer of the diorama theatre. 

photo of the moon
photo of the moon

On January 7, 1839, members of the French Académie des Sciences were shown outcomes of an invention that would forever change the nature of visual representation: photography. The astonishingly explicit pictures they saw were the work of Louis Daguerre (1787–1851), a painter and printmaker most famous until then as the possessor of the Diorama, a popular Parisian representation featuring professional painting and lighting effects. Each daguerreotype was a one-of-a-kind image on a very shining, silver-plated sheet of copper.