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Col. JK Bajaj first Indian to conquer South Pole

Col. JK Bajaj first Indian to conquer South Pole on 17 January 1989. Col. Jatinder Kumar Bajaj, is a mechanical engineer and experienced mountaineer was the first Indian and the first Asian to reach the South Pole on 17 January in the year 1989. JK Bajaj was the first Indian to conquer South Pole.

Col. JK Bajaj first Indian to conquer South Pole
Col. JK Bajaj first Indian to conquer South Pole

Bajaj’s accomplishment was more an outcome of confidence than the target and was the conclusion of a chain of situations that started in 1984. Bajaj was requested to attend a small Indian experimental team to examine the region encompassing Dakshin Gangotri, the Indian station at Antarctica, and to move navigation on a route, contact, and logistic pieces of knowledge for an Indian voyage to the South Pole in the year 1984. The recommended excursion was delayed, but Col. Bajaj was habituated by Antarctica and the incomplete responsibility of leading the team to the South Pole.

India has previously arrived in Antarctica and had the revelation to move further south. At the floor of the Earth to be Particular! Col. JK Bajaj was single-minded about to complete this incomplete execution and did the most useful he could and when the moment came he embraced it with both hands without a to miss.

In the year 1984 Bajaj was invited to show the way to a small company to examine the area encompassing Dakshin Gangotri which was an Indian station in Antarctica. The purpose of the study was to begin navigational, intelligence, and logistic considerations for an Indian voyage to the South Pole the next year. Though the calling was dangerous, Bajaj was regardless strong-minded to reach the South Pole.

Colonel J.K. Bajaj was the first Indian and first Asian to arrive at the South Pole at a 0-degree latitude in Antarctica. Bajaj, was the Principal of the Nehru Institute of Mountaineering, in Uttarkashi. Which was substantially below the Indian Antarctica location at Dakshin Gangotri. He was a part of the 11-member global excursion which skied over 1,200 km in 50 days in deprived of sensation temperatures.

In 1986 Bajaj attended the British Antarctic Research Centre in Cambridge, United Kingdom, where a possible meeting with Mr. Leo LeBon, President of Mountain Travel, United States of America brought the chance he had been expecting for. LeBon announced his proposals for a universal ski excursion to the South Pole throughout the austral summertime of 1988-89.

Col. Jatinder Kumar Bajaj has been awarded the President’s Gallantry Award, Indian Sena Medal, and Vishist Sewa Medal.