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Indian film actor & director Sohrab Modi

Indian film actor & director Sohrab Modi was born on 2 November 1897 in Mumbai and 28 January 1984 Mumbai. Sohrab Merwanji Modi was an Indian movie star, director, and producer. His movies include Khoon Ka Khoon which was released in the year 1935, which is a variant of Shakespeare’s The Tragedy story of Hamlet, his other movies include Sikandar, Pukar, Prithvi Vallabh, Jhansi ki Rani, Mirza Ghalib, Jailor, and Nausherwan-E-Adil.

Indian film actor & director Sohrab Modi
Indian film actor & director Sohrab Modi

Sohrab Modi was one of the ancient auteur-trailblazer of Indian film production, whose appearance controlled the old Indian cinema display in a flourishing profession in the different positions of producer, director, and actor. On finishing his education, Sohrab Modi’s chief in the academy encouraged him to secure his vibrant voice and become either a diplomat or an actor. His curiosity in movies stimulated, he quickly began a traveling theater with his brother’s projector. He also brought over his brother’s traveling theatre organization and played all over the country. 

An actor shaped in the Parsi Theatre culture, he frequently played Shakespearean play performances interpreted into the Urdu language. Acknowledging the deterioration in the universality of theatre with the beginning of music movies, he began the film company called Stage Film Company in the year 1935. His earliest adventure into movie direction was a straightforward modification of one of his successful shows, Shakespeare’s Hamlet, called Khoon Ka Khoon which was released in the year 1935. In the year 1936, he founded the Minerva Film Company in Mumbai. 

Sohrab Modi in a movie
Sohrab Modi in a movie

Notwithstanding, the first production under this banner, Saeed-E-Hawas, an evolution of Shakespeare’s The Life and Death of King John play, as great as the two successive attempts declined to be thriving which was released in the year 1936. For Saeed-E-Hawas, he established up two cameras to catch the show, which was then adapted into the final result. These opening efforts explained to him the distinction between stage and silver screen performance and introduced him to the broad potential for the playing arts free by the camera. For him, the manifestation of a director’s work rested in their knowledge to interpret writing onto the screen both visually and aurally.